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  1. #1


    Can anyone give me the order I'm supposed to read these books?

    I'm nowhere in this game I'm looking at programming for Ouya. I would love to send you my code for the game I'd like to start re-programming, but I can't. I was in a car wreck and while I was at the hospital and my only back-up didn't keep the code. He simply kept the executables and a handful of screen shots. I've only seen the EXECUTABLES (I'm saying they're un-editable.) run on a single laptop that I didn't own, so I just accepted it as loss.

    I'm looking to re-code Force Disruptor. I wish I had something more than a useless .exe. If anyone would like to see the game I have, just find some alternate way to contact me online. Anyway, to summarize the game, It's basically similar to Asteroids. Kinda. It's a line drawn game of a spaceship flying through space.

    I've ordered these 3 books:

    Unity 5 From Zero to Proficiency (Beginner): A step-by-step guide to coding your first game with Unity.
    Unity 5 From Zero to Proficiency (Foundations): A step-by-step guide to creating your first game with Unity
    Unity 5 From Zero to Proficiency (Intermediate): A step-by-step guide to coding your first game in C# with Unity.

    Is that order the correct order to read them?

  2. #2


    if you want to learn unity, that order is ok.

    if you want to make good games and become a profficient programmer, cancel that order. that is garbage.

  3. #3


    I already was/am(?) an averagely skilled game programmer. I'm just here to learn Unity. I was a student at the University of Wyoming, then I was in a car wreck.

    The code for my entire game library didn't get backed up. My best friend (AT THE TIME) backed up my entire library, but not the code. He just saved the executable files. I still have them, if anyone is interested in sharing with me their knowledge of executable decompilation. ... . But I quit riding the "desire for decompilation" horse a long, long time ago.

    In regard to the order I should take these courses, my Google search suggested that I should take them in this order:

    Unity 5 From Zero to Proficiency (Foundations): A step-by-step guide to creating your first game with Unity.
    Unity 5 From Zero to Proficiency (Beginner): A step-by-step guide to coding your first game with Unity.
    Unity 5 From Zero to Proficiency (Intermediate): A step-by-step guide to coding your first game in C# with Unity.

    Is it correct?

  4. #4
    OUYA Developer Jayenkai's Avatar
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    1 members found this post helpful.
    The tool you use isn't important.
    The way you learn is also unimportant.
    You need to understand logic, and how the parts of the programming puzzles go together.

    Read through all that you have, and be sure to reread when you don't understand each chapter.

    Post-crash, I assume you've got a lot of time on your hands, as you recouperate.
    It takes time to learn all the ins and out of coding, but reading and understanding all the important bits is good to get into it.

    Good ways to cram it in, as with most learning, is with pen and paper in hand. Read a chapter, jot down notes, and hopefully they'll stick in your head.
    Feel free to open Unity, or whatever language, at any point. But don't do simple "copy and paste" stuff if you truly want to "learn".
    Try your best to write everything yourself.
    Challenge yourself to a little quiz at the end of a chapter.
    Keep scribbling ideas and thoughts with your pen and paper.
    That's, realistically, the only way to actually learn these things.
    Jayenkai : Making unpopular games for over two and a half decades!
    OUYA/Cortex/Android TV compatible .apks available here.

  5. #5
    OUYA Developer Jayenkai's Avatar
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    It depends on how your head is coping.
    Either you really do need to relearn everything, in which case, yes,that's a good order..
    Or you might find that reading the first few chapters of intermediate might help spark some latent memories, and kickstart you back to where you were.

    But ... It's one of those "your own way" things that, realistically, only you can truly know.

    If it were me, I'd start reading book three, maybe a single chapter, and see if anything sparks.
    If not, go back to book one, and relearn.

    It's a pain to have to do it the long way, but ... It's something to do, isn't it!!
    Jayenkai : Making unpopular games for over two and a half decades!
    OUYA/Cortex/Android TV compatible .apks available here.

  6. #6


    So you're saying to start with "Unity 5 From Zero to Proficiency (Intermediate)" and then backpedal if it's at a level higher than I'm at?

    Is that correct?

  7. #7
    OUYA Developer Jayenkai's Avatar
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    Yeah, that's what I'd do. Test yourself at the high level first. ... I'm assuming you used to be up at the higher level, right?!!!
    Just basically see if the stuff's still in there, somewhere, and if not then go for the lower level.
    Jayenkai : Making unpopular games for over two and a half decades!
    OUYA/Cortex/Android TV compatible .apks available here.

  8. #8


    if you are an "averagely skilled game programmer" then go learn about "design patterns" and pay special attention to "game design patterns" link: http://gameprogrammingpatterns.com/

  9. #9
    I am the Night Killswitch's Avatar
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    Foundations and Beginner are basically the same thing. Close to it anyway. May be better off using the tutorials on the Unity site or the ones on youtube like Brackeys or some of the others out there. The twins...for some reason I'm drawing a blank on their names but they do good tutorials. I know I retweet several of them but just blanking out on names right now for some reason. But it's all about how you take the info in. There's even that book about coding 6 games or something which is kind of basic. The problem is that all books or tutorials will not go over every single step that you may need or you may not even need those steps and are ahead of them.

    Anyway, I'd use the free resources before buying unless you know that it's what you want.

  10. #10
    OUYA Developer Nooskewl's Avatar
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    Would start at the beginning, either Foundations or Beginner. There is no such thing as too much knowledge/information. Even if it's easy, you will learn things.

    The most important thing though is that you build some of the examples yourself... there's no substitute for actually making games.

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