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  1. #1
    Ouya Fan batCrazy's Avatar
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    Why did you buy an OUYA?

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    I thought this would be an interesting conversation.

    I personally bought the OUYA because I feel it's something that will revolutionize the gaming industry. Mobile gaming has emerge separately from console gaming. When mobile games first started up they were crappy. They didn't even come close to the console experience. Now, years later, they are finally approaching the console games in terms of fun factor and even graphics.

    It was bound to happen, when mobile and console games began to merge, and OUYA will be the first to do this. I can't wait to get my OUYA. I think it's the beginning of something special.

    Why did you buy an OUYA?

  2. #2
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    A few reasons

    - I had just gotten into Kickstarter not long before the Ouya kickstarter got started and i'm sure that was one reason.

    - I liked the idea the ppl behind it was going for. Having seen how good indie games have gotten these past few years i knew that you could make games for the Ouya that was good (regardless of what platform they where on). Games like Fez, Brink, Limbo and so on are great but doesn't require powerful hardware

    - As someone who loves RPGs on SNES and so on i understood right away (i mean on second 1) that this would be a great console for emulation.

    - If XBMC or something like it made it onto the Ouya it would probably be a great mediacenter device also. (my thinking before i pledged, on day 2 i think it was it was at 2 million or so when i pledged i think).


    That's basically it. If i can say one thing though. It's off-topic but i've been meaning to get it off my chest. Now it's not for the ppl in here you guys probably get it but for ppl in general. Like alot of you i'm sure i've been looking at various youtube clips of ppl talking about the Ouya and one thing i've gathered so far is that ppl seem to think that the console was made with the intention to bring mobile-phone games to the big screen. Now while the android thing makes it easy to port games to the Ouya (and yes i'm sure that was part of the thinking) alot of ppl seem to have misunderstood what Julie was talking about in the kickstarter video when she talked about the developers who was making games for the Android and iOS. People seem to think (as far as i understand it) that she wants these ppl to port their mobile stuff to this new console. But thats not it at all, that part is just a bonus. What she meant (granted this is just how i interpreted it) whas that she wanted the developers to move over the Ouya and make games for the console. Now at the beginning there will be alot of ports of mobile-phone games but i'm sure the thinking is that those developers will develop "real" games for the console in the future.

    Maybe it's just me that reacted badly to this but i'm kind of allergic to the thinking that the Ouya wants to be "the console you play Angry birds on" not "real" games... I could see games like Fez and so on running on Ouya. I don't own an Xbox so i don't know how good Xbox live arcade is but imagine the best games from there and the best indie games from Steam on the Ouya instead. It has potential and that was a major reason why i backed it (among the other reasons i mentioned).


    Sorry for my offtopic rant not really meant for the ppl in here just wanted to vent a little (hope thats ok).
    Last edited by dr-nix; 01-19-2013 at 02:41 PM.

  3. #3
    Ouya Devotee
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    I have been on kickstarter for quite some time and have backed a few projects. So when OUYA dropped in I was delighted. It was something that could bring back the old days I had with my Sega and nintendos and that plus I am an Android-fan. so it all added up.

  4. #4


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    Re: Why did you buy an OUYA?

    Good rant Dr nix. I totally agree with you. I think too many people think the OUYA will just be a phone games and emulator games console, I think there are many devs who will prove them otherwise.

    There are also people who seem to think the OUYA needs to be like other console, all this Mascot talk, its cool to have a Mascot but you have to let that evolve naturally, and if you love Mario so much go buy a Nintendo.

    I see this console as a great Indie game console, where new Indie developers wet there feet so to say. I think we will see quite a few games first launched on the OUYA, and if successful move onto the other platforms. This is why I brought the OUYA, and why I am developing my first game for it.
    Follow me on Twitter! - @Sam_Jessop

  5. #5
    Ouya Devotee d_brennen's Avatar
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    I'll quote myself like a raving loon

    Quote Originally Posted by d_brennen View Post
    What attracted me to the idea of Ouya is the way it gives indie devs a cheap entry, 15 minutes on the big screen for very little investment. Something that consoles have locked startup software houses out of, and the escalation of costs even on the PC side of things deters.

    I don't want free games from Ouya - I want risky, new, unusual, and probably flawed games. I want devs to try, maybe fail and come back with something better without losing their shirts.

    I'd pay for that, proper prices for good work
    That and replacing several devices with one do it all media streamer, retro emu and gaming system. I haven't owned a console since the Dreamcast and I'm not about to get either of the two mainstream machines and the WeeWee doesn't appeal (though I appreciate Ninty trying new things, someone has to)

  6. #6
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    Disclaimer: I have not purchased an OUYA - but I definitely plan on doing so, especially since I want to release games for the platform I'll need a physical device to test on

    I want to get an OUYA because ever since I was little I wanted to develop games for the PS2 and the Xbox, and when I got older I wanted to develop for the PS3 and the Xbox 360. Both of those were sort of locked out from me however (even though you can use XNA for the Xbox, you still had to pay a "developer's subscription fee", had absolutely no tools at your disposal aside from a rendering engine - I haven't seen any good XNA 4.0 game engine to date - and you had a limited size your game could be, just big enough for an XBLA title). OUYA is the first game console I will ever be able to write a game for (using the Unity engine, easily the most productive engine I have ever used), and that prospect for me is intensely thrilling.

  7. #7
    Ouya Devotee Reaperman's Avatar
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    -I'd never owned an android/ios device and felt that I had been missing out on games
    -I'm a video game collector and this will certainly become 'oddball hardware'
    -mainstream console gaming rarely targets me as a customer anymore (genre changes)
    -mainstream console gaming has developed an anti-consumer course lately
    -fair price for the hardware
    Last edited by Reaperman; 01-21-2013 at 07:37 AM.

  8. #8
    Administrator James Andrew Coote's Avatar
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    I backed the OUYA because I had already been developing a game for android, which was dragging on and I really needed to finish. Getting an OUYA would make for a nice new project to start once the current game was finished, and give me a deadline that I couldn't move, rather than these endless self-imposed deadlines that come and go. Being android, I could reuse all the skills and engine coding I'd done up to that point

    OUYA also represented a chance to get in on the ground floor with a new platform. I'd seen the android app store just get more and more crowded, seen the market change to this whole f2p idea where you need to get a mazillion players of whom only 0.1% actually pay for IAP content. As a one man company, I can't afford to support 700,000 users, nor can I pay for advertising to bump my game up the charts. And the games I really want to make are niche, not smash hits

    I must admit, the "must have free" nearly put me off. The last thing I want is for the OUYA to become just like the various app stores, where the race to the bottom / crash to $0/free has really warped people's perceptions of the value of games and eaten the heart out of the mid-tier games. The games that are bigger than some casual or indie game but aren't the blockbuster, $50mil AAA first-person-shooters. Some of my favourite games of all time wouldn't have stood a chance in today's market, and ultimately, it is those games that are the sort I aspire to make

    The "open" part of the console also almost made me pass it up, as android has terrible piracy problems from being open. The only way you can make money on android is by either doing the whole f2p thing, or accepting that 90% piracy rates will happen, and concentrating on the 10% who genuinely love your game enough to play it for hours on end and buy all the expansions when they come out. Both of those strategies rely on sheer weight of numbers winning the day. That is not something that OUYA is going to have (100k devices maybe? vs hundreds of millions of android smartphones and increasing numbers of tablets)

    Finally, it sounds terrible to admit, but I will have been making indie games coming up on 2 years by the time the OUYA launches, and I've consistently failed to actually ship a game. As much as OUYA is an immoveable deadline and something to aim for, it is also a last throw of the dice. If I can't make it work with OUYA, I'm going to have to get a regular 9 to 5 job like everyone else and actually get my career moving

    __


    I totally agree with dr-nix. OUYA has a real problem right now in that the gamer community, who are supposed to be championing OUYA as a way to open up the console space and bring in fresh ideas and original gaming, have instead decided it will be just a bunch of crappy ports from android.

    The problem is android. Android has a reputation for shovelware and lower quality games, and a place where only f2p games make it. Game developers prefer iOS because Apple has everyone's credit cards, so they don't need to think about piracy, because iOS has better developer tools, and because an iOS game, you just need to make it work on one or two screen sizes and you're done. So game devs always make for iOS, then think about porting later to android. But porting to android means changing the game for potentially any screen size. If you've designed a game to look pixel perfect, as you might do for iphone, rather than using percentages, weighted values etc that allow you to stretch and squish your game, then inevitably, it won't port well. The result is that iOS games really are higher quality and get released first on iOS, which just perpetuates the problems for gaming on android.

    Gamers have rejected android, especially when it has meant developers making 'casual' games rather than the mid-tier games they really love. Consoles are one of the great fortresses buttressing games against this tide of casual and f2p. Tell them that OUYA is going to bring android into the console space, and at best you get an apathetic response.

    The guys at OUYA took a huge risk by taking the "build it and game devs will come" approach. Considering that a console's success is ultimately down to the games made for it, that takes some guts. The danger was that they would have a limp selection of uninspired games, so they took a few decisions to mitigate that: The touchpad, giving away the extra consoles in competitions, and the partnering with unity were all attempts to get at least enough devs/games to make OUYA viable.

    There is a balance, between encouraging devs to make games for your console while ensuring quality remains above a certain standard. Hitting that sweet spot of quality vs. openness is something I'm not sure even Steam quite gets right

    So much of this balance still depends on the store and the submission process, neither of which we know much about. That is why people look for the nearest analogy, and that comes in the sorry shape of Google Play

    Edit: Now that is what I call a rant!
    @JamesACoote
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  9. #9
    OUYA Developer
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    The "open" part of the console also almost made me pass it up, as android has terrible piracy problems from being open. The only way you can make money on android is by either doing the whole f2p thing, or accepting that 90% piracy rates will happen, and concentrating on the 10% who genuinely love your game enough to play it for hours on end and buy all the expansions when they come out. Both of those strategies rely on sheer weight of numbers winning the day. That is not something that OUYA is going to have (100k devices maybe? vs hundreds of millions of android smartphones and increasing numbers of tablets)
    It has been discussed before however, there are many ways to help protect against piracy on OUYA.
    You could go the lazy route and just rely on contacting the OUYA servers for receipt information to check if the player has purchased the game (requiring an active internet connection at all times), or you could also store a game/player-specific UUID, which is unique both to the player and to your game (two games reporting the UUID will report different UUIDs for the same player, meaning a hacker can't create a fake "game" to report the UUID your game uses), and you could store this in some kind of license file upon purchase so the game first checks if this license file exists, then checks the contents of the file against the player's UUID. That means a hacker can't just drag and drop the APK and license file on another machine (since the UUID of the player will no longer match), and they also can't spoof the UUID without a lot of effort.
    But the main idea here is that the free and the full version of your game are one and the same, the game itself just checks whether it should run in free or full mode depending on whether the player has purchased the game, meaning it's not just as simple as ripping an APK since that APK is the same one anybody and their grandma could pull off of the marketplace for FREE.
    Hope that eases your fears a bit.

  10. #10
    Administrator James Andrew Coote's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Masaaki View Post
    It has been discussed before however, there are many ways to help protect against piracy on OUYA.
    You could go the lazy route and just rely on contacting the OUYA servers for receipt information to check if the player has purchased the game (requiring an active internet connection at all times), or you could also store a game/player-specific UUID, which is unique both to the player and to your game (two games reporting the UUID will report different UUIDs for the same player, meaning a hacker can't create a fake "game" to report the UUID your game uses), and you could store this in some kind of license file upon purchase so the game first checks if this license file exists, then checks the contents of the file against the player's UUID. That means a hacker can't just drag and drop the APK and license file on another machine (since the UUID of the player will no longer match), and they also can't spoof the UUID without a lot of effort.
    But the main idea here is that the free and the full version of your game are one and the same, the game itself just checks whether it should run in free or full mode depending on whether the player has purchased the game, meaning it's not just as simple as ripping an APK since that APK is the same one anybody and their grandma could pull off of the marketplace for FREE.
    Hope that eases your fears a bit.
    Yeah, people can still decompile your code to see how you are doing the UUID check and change it, but I'll admit it is not such a big concern for me now. It was however back in July when the kickstarter launched
    @JamesACoote
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