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SargNickfury
07-29-2013, 07:52 AM
I would really like to hack a ouya controller, and put it in a larger surface arcade platform, use happ joystick and buttons or sanwa. For the emulators and games on Ouya that are more arcade style! I'd do it myself but I stink and soldering.....in a perfect world I would purchase parts and make mounting and just send it to them to be put together. Anyone know a service like that? Or if you can show me how to do it without soldering that would be fine too...:D

My dream Joystick style for ouyah!
http://8-bitcentral.com/joystick/

If someone would offer a service to make these.....my god I would break my hand giving them money......heck I'll buy the parts if they can solder it and make it work. If it could use the wireless ouya PCB that would be swell....or if there's a cheaper way of connecting via bluetooth or USB wireless that would also be swell so long as I can map in my emulators!!! It wouldn't have to have full controls even most of the classic arcade games even fighting games only have so many buttons.

If anyone knows where I can get this done I would be appreciative.


I merged your threads. Please use the edit button next time rather than creating new threads about the same thing. Thanks. - DP

Magnesus
07-29-2013, 09:13 AM
How about something like that: http://www.richardlagendijk.nl/foto/cip/joystick_quickshot_qs_135_01.jpg - that would be awesome. :)

Cave Four
07-29-2013, 09:55 AM
http://www.gamestop.com/elect/accessories/neogeo-x-arcade-stick/104728

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPq7IdR4GiI

I hear these work with OUYA :)

SargNickfury
07-29-2013, 10:05 AM
Looking for real arcade hardware, Happ or Sanwa.....want the real arcade experience.

Cave Four
07-29-2013, 10:22 AM
Those are replicas of the original neogeo controllers, using real arcade parts.... I don't know how your going to get a closer experience for $50 from a retail store.

DrunkPunk
07-29-2013, 10:24 AM
You can make your own without soldering. Arcade Controls (http://arcadecontrols.com/arcade.htm) has tons of guides and build examples up.

Jakenut86
07-29-2013, 10:24 AM
I'm tempted to buy one of those :P

StarDust4Ever
07-29-2013, 10:24 AM
Oh, you mean something like this:
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5525/9367006833_78c7a67014.jpg
https://www.flickr.com/photos/30203515@N04/sets/72157634800361528/

Or this:
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5327/7201696706_60759742ff.jpg
https://www.flickr.com/photos/30203515@N04/sets/72157629736738048/

Looked like a good excuse to show off my custom built arcade controllers!:victorious:

-- As for the Ouya controller, it's got a lot of performance issues that prevent it from being an excellent solution. The PS3 controllers are far superior at least in games that fully support them. The stock Ouya controller also includes a touchpad to complicate things but lacks start + select buttons.

-- Also, not trying to rain on your parade, but most modern controller designs beyond the 16-bit era (5th generation and up) IMO are to complex for a traditional arcade joystick setup. True analog arcade joysticks are nigh impossible to find, although there are some optical models that would work, but they require a microcontroller to process the output signals. Assuming you're modding an existing controller and not building a custom schematic, it may be very difficult to interface a Happ 360 optical controller into a PCB that expects analog voltage divider pots. A digital-to-analog converter and custom schematics are necessary just to convert the signal into something the PCB can use. Then the PCB will only use an analog-to-digital converter to change it back. PRetty redundant if you ask me. So you would need two left joysticks, one 8-way and one Happ 360, in addition to the four face buttons and another Happ 360 for the right joystick. Then you are left with four triggers, two of them analog. FYI, I'm not sure if analog arcade buttons even exist. These need to be located in a position where they can be accessed at any time and with any combination of other controls. One possibility is to use flight stick style joysticks and mount the triggers on those. Herein lies the problem with triggers, because there's no good place to put them so that they can be reached from anywhere. Adding extra sets of trigger controls for optimum accessibility will only make the board look more like a space shuttle control panel and less like an arcade deck. Additionally, to simulate the touchpad of the Ouya controller, a trackball will need to be placed in the center of the arcade console, with a button for mouse clicks. How anyone will be able to interface this into the Ouya PCB board and controller logic will be anyone's guess. Again, custom schematics will need to be used.

Assuming the arcade controller will be used primarily for emulation or Mame-style games, a universal USB solution would suffice (or a console arcade controller with a USB/Console adapter), but it wouldn't have near the complexity or compatability with the Ouya's controller.

SargNickfury
07-29-2013, 02:43 PM
I really just want it for the 8 bit and 16 bit emu's and MAME. I don't even think I want an 8 directional switch, more interested in it for making the ouyah an 80's arcade jukebox. but as many of the ouya games are platformers I would like something to work with them too. I like the ps3 idea, but I just don't know how to make connections to ps3 inards. I will check above link, but I would love to find someone who'd be willing to put it together. or if someone made a good wireless ps3 fight stick with say sanwa that would be fine, I can always replace the stick with a 4 directional happ, I'm pretty good at building stuff, but soldering on circuitboards is just not something I am comfortable with.

StarDust4Ever
07-30-2013, 07:08 AM
:How about a How to video? I I can put together a pc, and I have a woodshop, I just know nothing about soldering electronics.Eventually I will get around to posting schematics, as well as scans of my graph paper blue prints which include hole placement and marquee design.

The 18x8x4 boxes used 1/2 inch hard plywood top/bottom panels are 18x8, front/back panels are 3x18, and side panels are 3x7. That creates an internal height of 3 inches, enough for most standard joysticks. Access to a real woodshop would make the build process far more efficient from the way I do it. I had to cut boards with a circular Skil saw by clamping the boards to a picnic table and using scrap wood as a guide for the blade in order to cut strait. I had to re-rig the boards and C-clamps for every cut. With a table saw, you could just set the blade guide and cut. Also I don't have a router so I had to hand bevel the edges with my hand sander. It takes a little over an hour to round out all the edges that way. Also, the hole saws were really designed to be used on a bench press, but I'm drilling holes freehand with a high torque plug in drill. It's the cheapest most powerful drill they had and it doesn't have a torque converter on it so I still need to twist the screws by hand so I don't strip them. I do drill starter holes to guide the screws so that helps, but hand driving screws into wood can be tough.

The NES Marquee I used spray paint and blue painters masking tape. On the SNES marquee I bought vinyl sheets and cut the patterns out by hand with an Exacto knife. I've seen more professional jobs with custom printed vinyl marquee and even acrylic tops but I have no access to such tools.

As for the electronic schematics, my major was Electrical Engineering Technology, so I can actually design schematics from scratch if needed. Sometimes they don't work as planned on the first attempt and need to be modified. For instance, I used a counter to add a digital turbo circuit to my NES controller. Rate can be set to toggle every 1, 2, 4, or 8 frames. But some games refresh the controller repeatedly, and I had to add some additional circuitry to account for this. If you're doing standard textbook controller schematic with no fancy added features, NES uses one CD4021 chip and SNES needs two, plus pull-down resistors for each input. Schematics are available on the web. I usually try to avoid hacking vintage controllers if possible but most people simply harvest a PCB from an original controller and solder wires directly to the buttons. My arcade boxes connect to the system by detachable third party extension cables. I also cut one cable to interface the circuit board.

SargNickfury
07-30-2013, 08:29 AM
The wood shop I got, I could build the cases lickity split, and dove tail em to show off.....:D I just can't figure out the wiring. Unless it can be done without any soldering. if I just got say some old 7800 controllers (for 2 buttons) and took them apart and then got happ 4 direction joystick (I think they make a 4/8 one that toggles) and some happ buttons, could it be wired fairly simply? the case is not an issue for me......I got a table saw, plenty of hole cutters a joiner, drills, etc etc etc... Need a new planer but I don't think this is going to require that....:D

In a perfect world I would make it long enough for two players, and put fire buttons on both sides so it's lefty friendly as well. I'm right handed but always feel better controlling with right and using left for buttons....maybe it's part of the mouse gaming thing.

StarDust4Ever
07-30-2013, 08:57 AM
My VCS arcade controller also has dual red buttons and I recently added paddles to it. It's a compact 8x8x4. Sadly, there's no 7800 functionality. The 8-bit Atari link on that website had an issue where the 7800 controls cannot easily be reached from both sides of the joystick. I have no buddies to play with so an extra long two player controller would be a waste for me personally.

VCS joysticks have no electrical components needed at all. Just strait up wires from the 9-pin connector to the buttons. The ground connects to all 5 buttons fire plus joystick) and the five contacts each have their own wire inside the cable. Sadly, one button isn't really enough for the vast majority of games. You can use a standard serial cable for the VCS instead of hacking a controller, but you'll at least need a continuity tester to make double sure the right wires are being connected.

Given that you have limited knowledge of electronics, I would recommend that you use the PCBs from preexisting controllers, despite I normally try to discourage hacking vintage hardware. Many clone controllers exist where the buttons aren't that great but the PCB is fine. You will need to buy a soldering iron and practice making electrical connections on scrap parts. You don't need detailed knowledge of electronics to understand that a button is simply a contact switch, and if you solder two wires onto a contact pad on a controller's PCB board, you can reroute them to a button on the arcade panel. The same goes for joysticks. One thing to bear in mind is that on the joystick assembly, the contacts are inverted, meaning pressing the joystick up actually closes the bottom switch.

These arcade controllers can be connected to a real game console or a USB adapter. I would recommend testing the controllers with a USB adapter first before you hook it up to a retro console. The six button Genesis layout especially will make a good MAME controller, with a USB adapter. I've done controllers for Atari, NES, SNES, so the next system to check off my list to is the Genesis.

SargNickfury
07-30-2013, 06:37 PM
I may give it ago, but come back crying for help.....:D Is there anywhere a USB to classic atari 9 converter? I see many going the otherway, from say an atari or nes controller converting them to USB. But If there were a converter from USB to these retro ports I would find it more useful. the reason I'd rather it be original Atari port first is I have an Atari XEGS 8-bit system I use, and converters to USB are easy to get ahold of.

Also no worries on controllers I may or may not hack, I was planning to find broken controllers, and there's a lot of junk ones out there, my Wico's and esp Epyx 500 will stay safe from harm. Not to mention for plain atari those new productions of the classic joysticks are everywhere.

Reaperman
07-30-2013, 07:15 PM
Those are replicas of the original neogeo controllers, using real arcade parts.... I don't know how your going to get a closer experience for $50 from a retail store.

Not to pick, but Neo Geo controllers (repro or original) don't use arcade parts. The stick sort of resembles one, but the buttons are typical of gamepads. I like neo geo controllers a lot, but they're just not arcade parts.

Actually that video claims that using a usb controller and ouya's software emulation is going to feel "just like you're playing on the real hardware or the neo geo x console." There's like 3 layers of 'wrong' going on right there. If I had kept watching the video, my head surely would have exploded.

SargNickfury
07-30-2013, 07:19 PM
lol Reaper, thought the same but let it slide.

DrunkPunk
07-31-2013, 11:52 AM
Here's a link to the USB control board: http://www.ultimarc.com/ipac1.html

You could combine that with something like this (http://www.amazon.com/Cables-Unlimited-Wireless-Transmitter-Receiver/dp/B0036VNZHA) and then you could have a wireless arcade stick.

megaman781
08-03-2013, 12:01 AM
I am trying to build an arcade cabinet with the ouya as the brain, i just received my ouya yesterday, and was disappointed to see that my arcade stick did not work on the ouya UI, well the joystick works but the buttons have no response. The good thing is that on some of the emulators i can remap the buttons and use my stick that way, im planning on buying an ipac for the control panel hopefully that would work, i would still have to have the ouya controller near by to access menus tho.

StarDust4Ever
08-03-2013, 12:54 AM
I am trying to build an arcade cabinet with the ouya as the brain, i just received my ouya yesterday, and was disappointed to see that my arcade stick did not work on the ouya UI, well the joystick works but the buttons have no response. The good thing is that on some of the emulators i can remap the buttons and use my stick that way, im planning on buying an ipac for the control panel hopefully that would work, i would still have to have the ouya controller near by to access menus tho.
You may just have to use a regular controller to load the emu, unless you root it and install a custom bootloader that loads into the emus for you. I wouldn't take those types of risks though since an update might brake your soft mod and potentially brick the console. IMO, it may just be easier to build a Maim cabinet out of an old microATX PC motherboard. Shuttle PCs, due to their small size, are very popular for custom MAME rigs. I've even heard of people stuffing them inside of old NES cases, but as I mentioned earlier I don't condone butchering vintage hardware.

Good luck and be sure to post pics when you're done! :triumphant:

BDG
08-03-2013, 02:27 AM
Oh, you mean something like this:
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5525/9367006833_78c7a67014.jpg
https://www.flickr.com/photos/30203515@N04/sets/72157634800361528/

Or this:
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5327/7201696706_60759742ff.jpg
https://www.flickr.com/photos/30203515@N04/sets/72157629736738048/

Looked like a good excuse to show off my custom built arcade controllers!:victorious:

-- As for the Ouya controller, it's got a lot of performance issues that prevent it from being an excellent solution. The PS3 controllers are far superior at least in games that fully support them. The stock Ouya controller also includes a touchpad to complicate things but lacks start + select buttons.

-- Also, not trying to rain on your parade, but most modern controller designs beyond the 16-bit era (5th generation and up) IMO are to complex for a traditional arcade joystick setup. True analog arcade joysticks are nigh impossible to find, although there are some optical models that would work, but they require a microcontroller to process the output signals. Assuming you're modding an existing controller and not building a custom schematic, it may be very difficult to interface a Happ 360 optical controller into a PCB that expects analog voltage divider pots. A digital-to-analog converter and custom schematics are necessary just to convert the signal into something the PCB can use. Then the PCB will only use an analog-to-digital converter to change it back. PRetty redundant if you ask me. So you would need two left joysticks, one 8-way and one Happ 360, in addition to the four face buttons and another Happ 360 for the right joystick. Then you are left with four triggers, two of them analog. FYI, I'm not sure if analog arcade buttons even exist. These need to be located in a position where they can be accessed at any time and with any combination of other controls. One possibility is to use flight stick style joysticks and mount the triggers on those. Herein lies the problem with triggers, because there's no good place to put them so that they can be reached from anywhere. Adding extra sets of trigger controls for optimum accessibility will only make the board look more like a space shuttle control panel and less like an arcade deck. Additionally, to simulate the touchpad of the Ouya controller, a trackball will need to be placed in the center of the arcade console, with a button for mouse clicks. How anyone will be able to interface this into the Ouya PCB board and controller logic will be anyone's guess. Again, custom schematics will need to be used.

Assuming the arcade controller will be used primarily for emulation or Mame-style games, a universal USB solution would suffice (or a console arcade controller with a USB/Console adapter), but it wouldn't have near the complexity or compatability with the Ouya's controller.

I started a Google + community called "Think it Design it Make it" see link below. I was wondering if you would be OK if I added your controller to the page, or if you are a G+ member you could. I am trying to get a community together to show off cool thinks people are making and these look awesome Great Work!!

https://plus.google.com/b/116482174549283567569/communities/109036868925324322977

StarDust4Ever
08-04-2013, 05:47 AM
I started a Google + community called "Think it Design it Make it" see link below. I was wondering if you would be OK if I added your controller to the page, or if you are a G+ member you could. I am trying to get a community together to show off cool thinks people are making and these look awesome Great Work!!

https://plus.google.com/b/116482174549283567569/communities/109036868925324322977

Go ahead. I still need to post the designs though.